Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Deutsche Lehnwörter im Englischen

After thinking about all the words from French that have seeped into English over hundreds of years, I thought I'd think about words from another language that I like better, German, having entered into English in, relatively, more recent years.

Big, Beautiful Compound Nouns
German nouns most especially have a certain solidity and all-encompassing feeling that one doesn't necessarily obtain from English nouns.  This is especially so when thinking of suitable equivalents to words like, "Weltanschauung" and "Zeitgeist".  To use the English translations of these two concepts, "world view" and "spirit of the times", just don't cut it, somehow.
"Now that little Haley is five, she'll be going to the 'garden of children' around the corner from here."  That sentence has hues of Bud Cort from Children of the Corn.  And, no, I'll not be sending my child there, thank you, but instead to a Kindergarten.
More goodies:
Schadenfreude, Wanderlust, Wunderkind

Food! 
Pretzels (Brezeln)
Bratwurst  
Sauerkraut
Delicatessen (Delikatessen)-where to find the food!

Psychology
Angst  (Thanks, Freud!)

Literature
Bildungsroman
Sturm und Drang

War
Blitzkrieg

Word du Jour (well, it was...)
uber-with or without the umlaut  


Profanity
Scheisse


If any of you have more vocabulary words originating from German that you'd like to contribute, then, bitte, send them to me!

It's now well past my bedtime, so Gesundheit and Goodnight!


4 comments:

  1. My German teacher once said, "German makes you sound like you have throat cancer."

    ReplyDelete
  2. Your German teacher and I should have a little talk...

    Viele liebe Gruesse aus London!
    Bea

    ReplyDelete
  3. Schadenfreude is not only one of my all time favorite words.... but one my my all time favorite things :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. @GG: yeah, it's a bad-ass word!

    ReplyDelete

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